Valerian Root by PN -2 (30 caps), A Natural Sleep & Anxiety Management Aid

$8.40

A study examined longer-term effects [of Valerian] in 121 participants with documented nonorganic insomnia, a sleep disorder (difficulty in going to sleep or getting enough sleep) that occurs as a symptom of a physical or mental disease. Participants received either 600 mg of a standardized commercial preparation of dried valerian root  or placebo for 28 days. After 28 days, the group receiving the valerian extract showed a decrease in insomnia symptoms compared with the placebo group. The differences in improvement between valerian and placebo increased between the assessments done on days 14 and 28. A possible mechanism by which a valerian extract may cause sedation is by increasing the amount of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA, an inhibitory neurotransmitter). Valerian extracts contain GABA in quantities sufficient to cause a sedative effect. Regarding the use of valerian root in treating anxiety, in one 2002 study of 36 patients with generalized anxiety disorder, found that 50 mg of valerian root extract given three times a day for four weeks significantly reduced one measure of anxiety compared to placebo. Other anxiety studies used slightly higher dosages.

 

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This product has not been evaluated by the FDA. It is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

A study examined longer-term effects [of valerian] in 121 participants with documented nonorganic insomnia [15],a sleep disorder (difficulty in going to sleep or getting enough sleep) that occurs as a symptom of a physical or mental disease. Participants received either 600 mg of a standardized commercial preparation of dried valerian root (LI 156, Sedonium?*) or placebo for 28 days. Several assessment tools were used to evaluate the effectiveness and tolerance of the interventions, including questionnaires on therapeutic effect (given on days 14 and 28), change in sleep patterns (given on day 28), and changes in sleep quality and well-being (given on days 0, 14, and 28). After 28 days, the group receiving the valerian extract showed a decrease in insomnia symptoms on all the assessment tools compared with the placebo group. The differences in improvement between valerian and placebo increased between the assessments done on days 14 and 28.

A possible mechanism by which a valerian extract may cause sedation is by increasing the amount of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA, an inhibitory neurotransmitter) available in the synaptic cleft. Results from an in vitro study using synaptosomes suggest that a valerian extract may cause GABA to be released from brain nerve endings and then block GABA from being taken back into nerve cells [23]. In addition, valerenic acid inhibits an enzyme that destroys GABA [reviewed in 24]. Valerian extracts contain GABA in quantities sufficient to cause a sedative effect, but whether GABA can cross the blood-brain barrier to contribute to valerian’s sedative effects is not known. Glutamine is present in aqueous but not in alcohol extracts and may cross the blood-brain barrier and be converted to GABA [25]. Levels of these constituents vary significantly among plants depending on when the plants are harvested, resulting in marked variability in the amounts found in valerian preparations [26].

Regarding the use of valerian root in treating anxiety, in one 2002 study of 36 patients with generalized anxiety disorder, found that 50 mg of valerian root extract given three times a day for four weeks significantly reduced one measure of anxiety compared to placebo. Other anxiety studies used slightly higher dosages.

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/ptr.1027

Who should not take valerian?
Women who are pregnant or nursing should not take valerian without medical advice because the possible risks to the fetus or infant have not been evaluated [36].
Children younger than 3 years old should not take valerian because the possible risks to children of this age have not been evaluated [36].
Individuals taking valerian should be aware of the theoretical possibility of additive sedative effects from alcohol or sedative drugs, such as barbiturates and benzodiazepines [10,37,38].
Does valerian interact with any drugs or supplements or affect laboratory tests?

Valerian might have additive therapeutic and adverse effects if taken with sedatives, other medications, or certain herbs and dietary supplements with sedative properties [39]. These include the following:

Benzodiazepines such as Xanax®, Valium®, Ativan®, and Halcion®.
Barbiturates or central nervous system (CNS) depressants such as phenobarbital (Luminal®), morphine, and propofol (Diprivan®).
Dietary supplements such as St. John’s wort, kava, and melatonin.

Individuals taking these medications or supplements should discuss the use of valerian with their healthcare providers.

Although valerian has not been reported to influence laboratory tests, this has not been rigorously studied [5,36,39].

https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Valerian-HealthProfessional/

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This product has not been evaluated by the FDA. It is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This product has not been evaluated by the FDA. It is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.