Probiotics 2 Billion CFU -Lactobacillus Acidophilus by PN, 2 (30 caps ), Help Balance the friendly bacteria in Your Digestive/Gastrointestinal System

$8.40

Probiotics  70-80% of our entire immune system resides within the digestive system. When necessary, inflammation in the intestines creates a pathway for the immune system to carry out an attack against invading viruses and bacteria. However, when inflammation is present but not needed, illnesses such as chronic infections can occur. Probiotics can also modulate the immune system, enhancing the body’s innate immunity. This modulating effect helps alleviate excessive inflammation in the digestive system, thereby boosting immune function.  Probiotics offer a beneficial defense against the effects caused by this unwarranted inflammation. Probiotics help keep the digestive system healthy, to ensure the immune system functions well. Epithelial tissues in the intestines form a barrier against pathogenic microbes and other harmful substances present. Probiotics foster intestinal epithelial cell survival, strengthen cell barrier function, and initiate protective responses

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This product has not been evaluated by the FDA. It is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

Lactobacillus acidophilus (Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM, here “Lactobacillus acidophilus”) is a probiotic strain available in conventional foods and dietary supplements. Its commercial availability in the United States since the mid-1970s is predicated on its safety and its biochemical and physiological attributes related to important human probiotic functionality. Clinical studies have indicated that a blend of probiotic strains containing Lactobacillus acidophilus decreased the incidence of pediatric diarrhea. Lactobacillus acidophilus led to a significant decrease in levels of toxic amines in the blood of dialysis patients with small bowel bacterial overgrowth. At adequate daily levels, Lactobacillus acidophilus may facilitate lactose digestion in lactose-intolerant subjects. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11233016

While Lactobacillus acidophilus is best known as a digestive aid, in a triple-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, pre-and post-intervention study, cognitive reactivity to sad mood was assessed. Compared to participants who received the placebo intervention, participants who received the 4-week multispecies probiotics intervention showed a significantly reduced overall cognitive reactivity to sad mood, which was largely accounted for by reduced rumination and aggressive thoughts. These results provide evidence that the intake of probiotics may help reduce negative thoughts associated with sad mood.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25862297

Furthermore scientific research identifies the following conditions as possibly benefiting from probiotics:

  • Stomach pain. Taking lactobacillus short-term seems to reduce symptoms in children with stomach pain. Early research also shows that taking lactobacillus and bifidobacterium short-term can improve symptoms in women with stomach pain.
  • Hay fever. Taking 2 billion colony-forming units of lactobacillus daily for 5 weeks can improve quality of life by almost 18% in people with grass pollen allergy that doesn’t respond to the anti-allergy drug loratadine. In children with allergies that persist throughout the year, taking 10 billion colony-forming units of lactobacillus for 12 weeks seems to improve itchy eye symptoms. But taking lactobacillus during pregnancy doesn’t seem to prevent the infant from developing allergies.
  • Diarrhea in people taking antibiotics (antibiotic-associated diarrhea). Taking probiotics products containing lactobacillus strains helps prevent diarrhea caused by antibiotics in adults and children. The most well-studied strain of lactobacillus seems to reduce the chance of diarrhea by about 60% to 70% when started within 2 days of beginning antibiotic treatment and continued for at least 3 days after finishing the antibiotics.
  • Eczema (atopic dermatitis). Most research shows that taking lactobacillus products can reduce eczema symptoms in infants and children. Research also shows that lactobacillus can help prevent eczema from developing. When taken by a mother during the last month of pregnancy, lactobacillus probiotics can reduce the chance of the child developing eczema. But not all strains seem to work.
  • Prone to allergies and allergic reactions (atopic disease). Research shows that taking certain lactobacillus strains can prevent the development of allergic reactions, such as asthma, runny nose, and eczema, in infants with a family history of this condition. However, not all strains seem to work.
  • Overgrowth of bacteria in the vagina. Researchers have found that lactobacillus suppositories and vaginal tablets may be effective in treating bacterial vaginosis. Researchers have also found that eating yogurt or using vaginal capsules containing lactobacillus can help prevent these infections from occurring again.
  • Diarrhea caused by cancer drug treatment. A chemotherapy drug called 5-fluorouracil can cause severe diarrhea and other gastrointestinal (GI) side effects. There is some evidence that patients with cancer of the colon or rectum have less severe diarrhea, less stomach discomfort, and shorter hospital care when they take lactobacillus.
  • Excessive crying in infants (colic). Some research shows that giving lactobacillus to nursing infants reduces daily crying time. Some research suggests that lactobacillus is more effective at reducing crying time than using the drug simethicone. But one large study shows that lactobacillus does not reduce crying. It’s possible that infants in the large study had more severe colic than those in the earlier research.
  • Constipation. Taking lactobacillus probiotics for 4-8 weeks can reduce symptoms of constipation including stomach pain and discomfort, bloating, and incomplete bowel movements. It might also increase the number of bowel movements in some people.
  • Diabetes. Taking lactobacillus starting at the beginning of the second trimester of pregnancy helps to prevent diabetes during pregnancy, especially in mothers over 35 years of age and mothers that had diabetes during another pregnancy. In women who develop diabetes during pregnancy, taking lactobacillus seems to help control blood sugar. In non-pregnant adults with diabetes, some early research shows that lactobacillus reduces sugar in the blood.
  • Diarrhea. Giving lactobacillus to infants and children 1-36 months old when they are admitted to the hospital seems to reduce the risk of developing diarrhea. Also, lactobacillus can reduce the risk of diarrhea from all causes in undernourished children. But most research shows that giving lactobacillus to children who already have diarrhea does not help them to get better faster.
  • A digestive tract infection that can lead to ulcers (Helicobacter pylori or H. pylori). Research shows that taking lactobacillus probiotics along with “triple therapy” that consists of the prescription drugs clarithromycin, amoxicillin, and a proton-pump inhibitor helps treat stomach ulcers caused by H. pylori. About 7-11 patients with H. pylori infections need to be treated with lactobacillus plus “triple therapy” for one additional patient to achieve remission compared to what would be achieved with “triple therapy” alone. But taking lactobacillus probiotics does not help treat the infection when taken alone, with only an antibiotic, with other “triple therapies,” or with “quadruple therapy” that includes bismuth. It is unclear if lactobacillus can reduce triple therapy-related adverse effects.
  • High cholesterol. Taking lactobacillus probiotics can lower total cholesterol by about 10 mg/dL and low-density lipoprotein (LDL or “bad”) cholesterol by about 9 mg/dL in people with or without high cholesterol. However, lactobacillus probiotics do not seem to improve high-density lipoprotein (HDL or “good”) cholesterol or fats called triglycerides.
  • Swelling (inflammation) and sores inside the mouth (oral mucositis). Research shows that taking lozenges containing lactobacillus from the first day of radiation/chemotherapy treatment until one week after reduces the number of patients who develop severe mouth sores.
  • A complication after surgery for ulcerative colitis (pouchitis). Taking lactobacillus by mouth seems to help treat pouchitis, a complication of surgery for ulcerative colitis. Taking a probiotic containing lactobacillus, bifidobacterium, and streptococcus for one year seems to maintain remission in 85% of people with this condition. Taking a different formulation containing two lactobacillus species and bifidobacterium for 9 months seems to reduce pouchitis severity.
  • Infection of the airways. Some research shows that lactobacillus probiotics can help prevent airway infections in infants and children. Giving lactobacillus to infants and children seems to reduce the chance of upper airway infections. Also, children ages 1-6 years who attend daycare centers seem to get fewer and less severe airway infections when given milk containing lactobacillus. However, not all strains seem to work. In adults, drinking fermented milk that contains lactobacillus might help prevent airway infections and decrease how long the infections last.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Research shows that taking lactobacillus for 8 weeks reduces tender and swollen joints in women with rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Travelers’ diarrhea. Travelers’ diarrhea is caused by bacteria, viruses, or parasites that the traveler has not been exposed to before. Taking lactobacillus seems to help prevent diarrhea in travelers. The effectiveness can vary a lot depending on the travel destination because of differences in bacteria in different locations.
  • A type of inflammatory bowel disease (ulcerative colitis). Lactobacillus probiotics seem to increase remission in people with ulcerative colitis. The best evidence of benefit is for a multi-species probiotic containing lactobacillus, bifidobacterium, and streptococcus. Research shows that taking this product can increase remission rates by almost 2-fold when used with standard ulcerative colitis treatment. Taking a single strain of lactobacillus also seems to improve symptoms. But lactobacillus doesn’t seem to prevent ulcerative colitis relapse. https://medlineplus.gov/druginfo/natural/790.html

70-80% of our entire immune system resides within the digestive system. When necessary, inflammation in the intestines creates a pathway for the immune system to carry out an attack against invading viruses and bacteria. However, when inflammation is present but not needed, illnesses such as chronic infections can occur. Probiotics can also modulate the immune system, enhancing the body’s innate immunity. This modulating effect helps alleviate excessive inflammation in the digestive system, thereby boosting immune function.  Probiotics offer a beneficial defense against the effects caused by this unwarranted inflammation. Probiotics help keep the digestive system healthy, to ensure the immune system functions well. Epithelial tissues in the intestines form a barrier against pathogenic microbes and other harmful substances present. Probiotics foster intestinal epithelial cell survival, strengthen cell barrier function, and initiate protective responses https://www.enviromedica.com/wellness/probiotics-immune-system/

 

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).
This product has not been evaluated by the FDA. It is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).  This product has not been evaluated by the FDA. It is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.