Vitamin A 10,000 IU, 2 x (30 Softgels)

$7.53

Vitamin A 10,000 IU, 2 x (30 Softgels)
UPC: 858765000465
ITEM: 54630

Vitamin A 10,000 IU by PN – 2 (30 caps), Helps maintain health eyesight, Enhance immune function for over all well-being.

 

Your eyes are complex organs that need many different vitamins and nutrients to function properly.Common conditions, such as diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma and cataracts, can impact your eyes.Though a variety of different factors causes these conditions, nutrition seems to have an influence on all of them. Vitamin A is essential in protecting your eye health from the effects of aging. Your eyes use Vitamin A to repair eye tissue and preserve mucus membranes, a vitamin that also boosts immune strength and skin health.

The most common symptom of vitamin A deficiency is an eye condition called xerophthalmia. Xerophthalmia is the inability to see in low light, and it can lead to blindness if it isn’t treated.

https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminA-Consumer/

Vitamin A and β-carotene nutrients as protective factors against cataracts was studied was to summarize the evidence from epidemiologic studies of vitamin A and β-carotene with the risk for cataract. Conclusions: Greater vitamin A and β-carotene intakes might be inversely associated with risk for cataract.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25194611/

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most prevalent cause of irreversible blindness in developed countries. Recently, high-dose supplementation with beta carotene, vitamins C and E, and zinc was shown to slow the progression of AMD.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/16380590/

The most common symptom of vitamin A deficiency is an eye condition called xerophthalmia. Xerophthalmia is the inability to see in low light, and it can lead to blindness if it isn’t treated.

https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminA-Consumer/

Vitamin A and β-carotene nutrients as protective factors against cataracts was studied was to summarize the evidence from epidemiologic studies of vitamin A and β-carotene with the risk for cataract. Conclusions: Greater vitamin A and β-carotene intakes might be inversely associated with risk for cataract.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25194611/

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most prevalent cause of irreversible blindness in developed countries. Recently, high-dose supplementation with beta carotene, vitamins C and E, and zinc was shown to slow the progression of AMD.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/16380590/

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This product has not been evaluated by the FDA. It is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.